Do the Boston Tea Party and Jesus’ cleansing of the temple justify violence?

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Do the Boston Tea Party and Jesus’ cleansing of the temple justify violence?
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Do the Boston Tea Party and Jesus’ cleansing of the temple justify violence?

Who (or what) did Jesus drive from the temple?

Another justification for the violence of these days is a meme picturing Jesus turning over tables in the temple while using a whip to threaten the moneychangers. The caption says: “If someone asks, ‘What would Jesus do?’ Remind them that turning over tables and breaking out whips is a possibility.”
However, as Nathan W. O’Halloran notes, the Greek of John 2:15 clearly states that Jesus used his whip to drive the animals from the temple, not the moneychangers. At no point did he endanger or harm humans.

To make this event analogous to the violence we’re discussing, our Lord would have harmed innocent bystanders, destroyed their property, and burned down their homes and businesses. None of which happened, of course. To the contrary, Jesus acted on behalf of people very much like those being victimized by the violence of recent days.

“Be constructive, not destructive”
If violence is the wrong way to respond to Mr. Floyd’s death, what is the right way?
John Lewis, an icon of the Civil Rights movement, stated a few days ago: “Rioting, looting, and burning is not the way. Organize. Demonstrate. Sit-in. Stand up. Vote. Be constructive, not destructive. History has proved time and again that non-violent, peaceful protest is the way to achieve the justice and equality that we all deserve.”

This week, we’re applying Jesus’ teachings to this crisis. Today, let’s focus on our Lord’s instructions in light of Rep. Lewis’s call to “be constructive, not destructive.”

First, taking his precepts in reverse order, we must be sure we are not part of the problem.
Jesus taught us, “If you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift” (Matthew 5:23–24).

In the context of racism, how do we know if “your brother has something against you”? Ask the Lord to bring to mind any attitudes, words, and actions—or inactions—that have offended someone of a different race. Then ask someone of a different race the same question. If needed, do all we can to seek forgiveness and reconciliation.

Second, we should find ways to be part of the solution.
Jesus commissioned us to “make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19); the Greek word for “nations” is ethnos, from which we get “ethnicities.” In response, early Christians welcomed Jews from fifteen different language groups (Acts 2:9–11), then shared Christ with Samaritans (Acts 8:5–8), Gentiles (Acts 10:34–43), slaves (Philemon 10), and women (Acts 16:13–15), thus breaking down every cultural barrier in their day.

You and I cannot do all that must be done to combat racism and injustice in our culture. But we can do something. We each have been given resources, abilities, spiritual gifts, and influence that can make a real difference in other lives and our society. We must not allow the enormity of the crisis to keep us from doing what we can in response.

“God’s ultimate purpose” for your life
To follow Jesus’ teachings, we need to be like Jesus. We need his love for all people and his bold initiative to make a difference.
Oswald Chambers advised us: “Never trust anything but the grace of God in yourself or in anyone else.” How can we grow in such grace?

Chambers: “God expects my personal life to be a ‘Bethlehem.’ Am I allowing my natural life to be slowly transfigured by the indwelling life of the Son of God? God’s ultimate purpose is that his Son might be manifest in my mortal flesh.”

Will you ask Jesus to manifest himself in your courageous compassion today?

No, it does not justify violence. Jesus drove out the people who are buying and selling in the temple. He overturned the tables and benches of the money changers. However, He did not hurt anyone, stole something or set anything on fire for He is a holy one. Anger is an emotion given by God but there is a proper way to manage it. Organizing a non-violent peaceful protest can be done by starting in ourselves, to set an example so that other people can follow through.

[quote=“FaithinGod, post:1, topic:3013”]
John Lewis, an icon of the Civil Rights movement, stated a few days ago: “Rioting, looting, and burning is not the way. Organize. Demonstrate. Sit-in. Stand up. Vote. Be constructive, not destructive. History has proved time and again that non-violent, peaceful protest is the way to achieve the justice and equality that we all deserve.”
[/quote] <-- I love this quote. I wish more people would put this to heart.

Honestly @FaithinGod I hope what you shared here would be published in other platforms and that many other people would be challenged and reminded by it.

That portion of Scriptures has been taken out of context several times, and whenever people like to justify their violent ways. We should understand the context – Jesus was grieved about what the people were making of His Father’s Temple. And yes, like what you and @kbadum said, Jesus was not violent against the people. The killing of George Floyd is the opening of Pandora’s Box. It should be condemned, and yes I am for the (peaceful) protests and for standing up for justice, but this should not be compared to Jesus’s actions against those who were desecrating a holy place.

The Old Testament is against injustice, and we should too, but if people would really like to know what would Jesus do, well, it’s not a mystery what he would. When soldiers hurt and took his life on the cross, we all know what He did :wink:

Hello, dear @FaithinGod
Great read! That’s post on christianpost.com was something… I agree with pretty much everything on it, violence is never the answer, if you think about it, violence is a cycle. A cycle of sin and destruction that will never ceases if we don’t take notice of it. We got to be more than that, and learn against who and why fight for. I agree that protest and actions are needed, but violence, rioting and looting, how will racism or injustice stop by destroying or robbing someone else?
I like that thinking that, what would Jesus do, but I am 100% sure that Jesus wouldn’t do what some people are doing. It’s preposterous.
Kind regards, Luis Guerrero.

Then Jesus said to him, “Put your sword back into its place. For all who take the sword will perish by the sword. Do you think that I cannot appeal to my Father, and he will at once send me more than twelve legions of angels? But how then should the Scriptures be fulfilled, that it must be so?
Isaiah 60:18